Tag Archives: cooking equipment

Basic Cooking Equipment Maintenance Requirements

This entry is part of 12 in the series Fire Prevention

Your cooking equipment is probably the most important thing inside your restaurant. One unexpected failure could ruin a busy dinner service. Even worse, a kitchen fire could put you out of service for days, or even weeks.

To keep your equipment – and your business – operational, the following five points are often the most critical routine maintenance requirements in the kitchen. The best practices listed below are the requirements of Society Insurance and are based on our company’s loss history and expertise in the restaurant markets that we serve. These best practices closely reflect the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards and may be more or less stringent than the NFPA standards.  (more…)

Clean Cooking Equipment to Prevent Grease Fires

This entry is part 8 of 12 in the series Fire Prevention

Onion rings, french fries, cheese curds, fried chicken, Friday fish fry. Is your mouth watering yet? What do all of these have in common – aside from being delicious, of course? These are just a few of the culprits when it comes to the production of large amounts of grease involved with commercial cooking. While exhaust hoods are designed to collect a lot of these grease-laden vapors and residues during the cooking process, the commercial cooking equipment being used to heat up the food is often overlooked and can become a collection point for grease.

For each year from 2011 to 2013, an estimated 5,600 restaurant fires were reported to fire departments in the United States, resulting in no fewer than five deaths, 100 injuries, and $116 million in property damage. Of those 5,600 fires, 64% involved cooking and grease played a factor in nearly half of those incidents (Source: U.S. Fire Administration). (more…)

Learning from Loss: Cooking Equipment Fires

This entry is part 5 of 12 in the series Fire Prevention

FIRE! This is a word you never want to hear in your business and it is the call in the night you never want to get. Best scenario is no one is hurt and it is only property damage, but even then it will still be devastating to your business. The investigation to determine the cause of the fire can go on for months and the clean-up from even a small fire may take several days and require a business shut down. In addition to the fire damage there will also be smoke and water damage that can extend out some distance from the original location of the fire.

The best response is to prevent the fire before it starts, so where do we begin?

To find out where to begin, I asked for help from one of Society’s experts, (more…)